MajoringInDebt
cartoonpolitics:

(changes to SAT)
Thirty-two hours of higher quality work is better than 40 hours of lower quality work

Paul Combe, the president of American Student Assistance, likened the growing burden of student loan debt to secondhand smoke: like cigarettes, loan debt used to be seen as a matter of individual risk — until it became clear that everyone’s economic health is affected by everyone else’s.

“It’s a problem for us all,” Combe told VICE News. “The question is, what is the impact on our economy when a third of the credit of all these students who graduate and are normally the consumers — who would otherwise buy homes and buy cars — is already eaten up by student loans?”

vimeo:

Watch some of the best animated shorts on Vimeo, curated by Complex Art.

mattbors:

Bundy Ranch Activism
Even luckier, your mom decides to stay home during your formative cognitive years so she can read you storybooks on the sofa, and help you play alphabet building blocks on the carpet. Except, in that case, she hasn’t been able to earn anything in the free-enterprise system enabling her to put aside for your college tuition, and so—even though you really excelled in public school and are all excited about going on to university—there’s no money to buy the tuition with, in which case you become a customer of one of the more lucrative operations in the American free-enterprise system (the student loan business) and borrow the dollars for your college tuition, which means that when you finally graduate and get that good first job and start earning, a substantial portion of what you earn will have to go towards paying off your $29,000 student debt instead of buying the things for your good life. If you happen to marry someone in the same boat, your young, starting out family now has a combined debt of nearly $60,000—and you haven’t even bought anything yet! Which you won’t be doing anytime soon, either, because not only do you have pay back the $60,000 (plus interest and penalties) you have to start saving immediately for the day care expenses for your future toddlers (what else did you get married for?) which you’ll be forced to incur because staying home to read them storybooks is not an option since it’s going to take all of two incomes to pay off your college debt while at the same time saving for your kid’s future college tuition.
Yahoo spends $58 million to fire its chief operating officer

$58 million for 15 months of work.
That’s what Yahoo’s Chief Operating Officer Henrique De Castro got in severance pay when he was sent packing on Jan. 16, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing made public on Wednesday.
When you factor in De Castro’s salary and stock-based compensation, he earned roughly $244,000 a day — assuming he worked weekends — by Forbes’s calculations.

Yahoo spends $58 million to fire its chief operating officer

$58 million for 15 months of work.

That’s what Yahoo’s Chief Operating Officer Henrique De Castro got in severance pay when he was sent packing on Jan. 16, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing made public on Wednesday.

When you factor in De Castro’s salary and stock-based compensation, he earned roughly $244,000 a day — assuming he worked weekends — by Forbes’s calculations.

Income Inequality Institute Will Pay Paul Krugman $25,000 Per Month

In late February, the City University of New York announced that it had tapped Princeton economist and New York Times blogger Paul Krugman for a distinguished professorship at CUNY’s Graduate Center and its Luxembourg Income Study Center, a research arm devoted to studying income patterns and their effect on inequality.
About that. According to a formal offer letter obtained under New York’s Freedom of Information Law, CUNY intends to pay Krugman $225,000, or $25,000 per month (over two semesters), to “play a modest role in our public events” and “contribute to the build-up” of a new “inequality initiative.” It is not clear, and neither CUNY nor Krugman was able to explain, what “contribute to the build-up” entails.

It’s certainly not teaching. “You will not be expected to teach or supervise students,” the letter informs Professor Krugman, who replies: “I admit that I had to read it several times to be clear … it’s remarkably generous.”
CUNY, which is publicly funded, pays adjunct professors approximately $3,000 per course. The annual salaries of tenured (but undistinguished) professors, meanwhile, top out at $116,364, according to the most recent salary schedule negotiated by the university system’s faculty union. And those professors are expected to teach and publish.

Income Inequality Institute Will Pay Paul Krugman $25,000 Per Month

In late February, the City University of New York announced that it had tapped Princeton economist and New York Times blogger Paul Krugman for a distinguished professorship at CUNY’s Graduate Center and its Luxembourg Income Study Center, a research arm devoted to studying income patterns and their effect on inequality.

About that. According to a formal offer letter obtained under New York’s Freedom of Information Law, CUNY intends to pay Krugman $225,000, or $25,000 per month (over two semesters), to “play a modest role in our public events” and “contribute to the build-up” of a new “inequality initiative.” It is not clear, and neither CUNY nor Krugman was able to explain, what “contribute to the build-up” entails.

It’s certainly not teaching. “You will not be expected to teach or supervise students,” the letter informs Professor Krugman, who replies: “I admit that I had to read it several times to be clear … it’s remarkably generous.”

CUNY, which is publicly funded, pays adjunct professors approximately $3,000 per course. The annual salaries of tenured (but undistinguished) professors, meanwhile, top out at $116,364, according to the most recent salary schedule negotiated by the university system’s faculty union. And those professors are expected to teach and publish.

There’s been a lot of misinformation recently about my decision to buy a seven-unit San Francisco home and evict all the other tenants, including a city school teacher, just so I can have the place to myself.

People are saying it’s a bad thing. Somehow they’re using Google to spread this lie. It had never before occurred to me that such a thing could happen.

So I need to clear the record: as a Google employee, I need the homes of seven school teachers to survive. It’s just a fact of life, like the food chain, or the singularity.

People like me, who are in the tech sector, who are changing the world, simply outrank people like teachers, who can never shape the future. Not when all they have are the primitive brains of children to work with.

Have you seen those things? Most of them can’t even play chess, let alone return ranked search results. Trust me when I say this — I’ve seen the research — children are not our future.

maplibrary:

maptacular:

Maps Show Evictions In San Francisco Are Often Near ‘Google Bus’ Stops
“About 69% of “no-fault” housing evictions in San Francisco take place within four blocks of shuttle bus stops for tech employees, according to the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, an online resource created by activists who are opposed to the gentrification of the city by wealthy tech workers.
So-called “Google buses” are controversial in San Francisco because they make it easier for tech employees to live in the city and commute to Silicon Valley. That has driven up rents and real estate prices in the city, forcing out some non-tech workers.”
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/san-francisco-google-bus-stop-evictions-2014-4#ixzz2yVnv51VR

I’m sitting here at my desk listening to Geographers talk about these shuttles. Oh goodness.  We’ll see what the city decides…

maplibrary:

maptacular:

Maps Show Evictions In San Francisco Are Often Near ‘Google Bus’ Stops


About 69% of “no-fault” housing evictions in San Francisco take place within four blocks of shuttle bus stops for tech employees, according to the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, an online resource created by activists who are opposed to the gentrification of the city by wealthy tech workers.

So-called “Google buses” are controversial in San Francisco because they make it easier for tech employees to live in the city and commute to Silicon Valley. That has driven up rents and real estate prices in the city, forcing out some non-tech workers.”


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/san-francisco-google-bus-stop-evictions-2014-4#ixzz2yVnv51VR

I’m sitting here at my desk listening to Geographers talk about these shuttles. Oh goodness.  We’ll see what the city decides…